Microsoft Azure Site Recovery

Azure Site Recovery orchestrates and manages disaster recovery for Azure VMs, and on-premises VMs and physical servers. As an organization you need to figure out how you're going to keep your data safe, and apps/workloads running when planned and unplanned outages occur. Azure Recovery Services contribute to your BCDR strategy. Site Recovery helps ensure business continuity by keeping your apps running on VMs and physical servers available if a site goes down. Site Recovery replicates workloads running on VMs and physical servers so that they remain available in a secondary location if the primary site isn't available. It recovers workloads to the primary site when it's up and running again.

Microsoft Azure Site Recovery

Azure Site Recovery orchestrates and manages disaster recovery for Azure VMs, and on-premises VMs and physical servers. As an organization you need to figure out how you're going to keep your data safe, and apps/workloads running when planned and unplanned outages occur. Azure Recovery Services contribute to your BCDR strategy. Site Recovery helps ensure business continuity by keeping your apps running on VMs and physical servers available if a site goes down. Site Recovery replicates workloads running on VMs and physical servers so that they remain available in a secondary location if the primary site isn't available. It recovers workloads to the primary site when it's up and running again.

Microsoft Azure Site Recovery

Azure Site Recovery orchestrates and manages disaster recovery for Azure VMs, and on-premises VMs and physical servers. As an organization you need to figure out how you're going to keep your data safe, and apps/workloads running when planned and unplanned outages occur. Azure Recovery Services contribute to your BCDR strategy. Site Recovery helps ensure business continuity by keeping your apps running on VMs and physical servers available if a site goes down. Site Recovery replicates workloads running on VMs and physical servers so that they remain available in a secondary location if the primary site isn't available. It recovers workloads to the primary site when it's up and running again.

Download Azure Site Recovery Overview Presentation

  • Automated protection and replication of virtual machines.

  • Replication to—and recovery in—Azure.

  • Remote health monitoring.

  • Customizable recovery plans.

  • No-impact recovery plan testing.

  • Orchestrated recovery when needed.

Download Azure Site Recovery Overview Presentation

  • Automated protection and replication of virtual machines.

  • Replication to—and recovery in—Azure.

  • Remote health monitoring.

  • Customizable recovery plans.

  • No-impact recovery plan testing.

  • Orchestrated recovery when needed.

Download Azure Site Recovery Overview Presentation

  • Automated protection and replication of virtual machines.

  • Replication to—and recovery in—Azure.

  • Remote health monitoring.

  • Customizable recovery plans.

  • No-impact recovery plan testing.

  • Orchestrated recovery when needed.

Simple, automated protection and disaster recovery in the cloud

Protect your environment by automating the replication of the virtual machines, based on policies that you set and control. Azure Site Recovery can protect Microsoft Hyper-V, VMware and physical servers, and you can use Azure or your secondary datacenter as your recovery site. Site Recovery coordinates and manages the ongoing replication of data by integrating with existing technologies including System Center and Microsoft SQL Server AlwaysOn.

Simple, automated protection and disaster recovery in the cloud

Protect your environment by automating the replication of the virtual machines, based on policies that you set and control. Azure Site Recovery can protect Microsoft Hyper-V, VMware and physical servers, and you can use Azure or your secondary datacenter as your recovery site. Site Recovery coordinates and manages the ongoing replication of data by integrating with existing technologies including System Center and Microsoft SQL Server AlwaysOn.

Simple, automated protection and disaster recovery in the cloud

Protect your environment by automating the replication of the virtual machines, based on policies that you set and control. Azure Site Recovery can protect Microsoft Hyper-V, VMware and physical servers, and you can use Azure or your secondary datacenter as your recovery site. Site Recovery coordinates and manages the ongoing replication of data by integrating with existing technologies including System Center and Microsoft SQL Server AlwaysOn.

Orchestrated disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS)

Use Site Recovery to automate the recovery of services when a site outage happens at the primary datacenter. Bring over applications in an orchestrated way to help restore service quickly, even for complex multi-tier workloads. Easily create disaster recovery plans in the Microsoft Azure classic portal, where they are stored. The disaster recovery plans can be as simple or advanced as your business requirements demand, including the execution of custom Windows PowerShell scripts and Azure Automation runbooks and pauses for manual interventions. Customise networks by mapping virtual networks between the primary and recovery sites and test disaster recovery plans whenever you want without disrupting the services at your primary location.

Orchestrated disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS)

Use Site Recovery to automate the recovery of services when a site outage happens at the primary datacenter. Bring over applications in an orchestrated way to help restore service quickly, even for complex multi-tier workloads. Easily create disaster recovery plans in the Microsoft Azure classic portal, where they are stored. The disaster recovery plans can be as simple or advanced as your business requirements demand, including the execution of custom Windows PowerShell scripts and Azure Automation runbooks and pauses for manual interventions. Customise networks by mapping virtual networks between the primary and recovery sites and test disaster recovery plans whenever you want without disrupting the services at your primary location.

Orchestrated disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS)

Use Site Recovery to automate the recovery of services when a site outage happens at the primary datacenter. Bring over applications in an orchestrated way to help restore service quickly, even for complex multi-tier workloads. Easily create disaster recovery plans in the Microsoft Azure classic portal, where they are stored. The disaster recovery plans can be as simple or advanced as your business requirements demand, including the execution of custom Windows PowerShell scripts and Azure Automation runbooks and pauses for manual interventions. Customise networks by mapping virtual networks between the primary and recovery sites and test disaster recovery plans whenever you want without disrupting the services at your primary location.

Replication and disaster recovery to Azure

Replicate your workloads to Azure and enable new capabilities. Applications can be migrated to Azure with just a few clicks or burst to Azure temporarily when you encounter a surge in demand. Run reports and analytics on copies of production workloads in Azure without affecting customers. DevTest new versions of applications with copies of live data and then seamlessly put the new version into production in your datacenter.

Replication and disaster recovery to Azure

Replicate your workloads to Azure and enable new capabilities. Applications can be migrated to Azure with just a few clicks or burst to Azure temporarily when you encounter a surge in demand. Run reports and analytics on copies of production workloads in Azure without affecting customers. DevTest new versions of applications with copies of live data and then seamlessly put the new version into production in your datacenter.

Replication and disaster recovery to Azure

Replicate your workloads to Azure and enable new capabilities. Applications can be migrated to Azure with just a few clicks or burst to Azure temporarily when you encounter a surge in demand. Run reports and analytics on copies of production workloads in Azure without affecting customers. DevTest new versions of applications with copies of live data and then seamlessly put the new version into production in your datacenter.

Types of Disaster Recovery

Back-up

This is the simplest type of disaster recovery and entails storing data off site or on a removable drive. However, just backing up data provides only minimal business continuity help, as the IT infrastructure itself is not backed up.

Cold Site

In this type of disaster recovery, an organization sets up a basic infrastructure in a second, rarely used facility that provides a place for employees to work after a natural disaster or fire.

Hot Site

A hot site maintains up-to-date copies of data at all times. Hot sites are time-consuming to set up and more expensive than cold sites, but they dramatically reduce down time.

Datacenter Disaster Recovery

The physical elements of a data center can protect data and contribute to faster disaster recovery in certain types of disasters. For instance, fire suppression tools will help data and computer equipment survive a fire. A backup power source will help businesses sail through power outages without grinding operations to a halt. Of course, none of these physical disaster recovery tools will help in the event of a cyber-attack.

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS):

In the event of a disaster or ransomware attack, a DRaaS provider moves an organization’s computer processing to its own cloud infrastructure, allowing a business to continue operations seamlessly from the vendor’s location, even if an organization’s servers are down.

Back Up as a Service:

Similar to backing up data at a remote location, with Back Up as a Service, a third-party provider backs up an organization’s data, but not its IT infrastructure.

Instant Recovery

Instant recovery is similar to point-in-time copies, except that instead of copying a database, instant recovery takes a snapshot of an entire virtual machine.

Point-In-Time Copies

Point-in-time copies, also known as point-in-time snapshots, make a copy of the entire database at a given time. Data can be restored from this back-up, but only if the copy is stored off site or on a virtual machine that is unaffected by the disaster.

Virtualization

Organizations can back up certain operations and data or even a working replica of an organization’s entire computing environment on off-site virtual machines that are unaffected by physical disasters.

Types of Disaster Recovery

Back-up

This is the simplest type of disaster recovery and entails storing data off site or on a removable drive. However, just backing up data provides only minimal business continuity help, as the IT infrastructure itself is not backed up.

Cold Site

In this type of disaster recovery, an organization sets up a basic infrastructure in a second, rarely used facility that provides a place for employees to work after a natural disaster or fire.

Hot Site

A hot site maintains up-to-date copies of data at all times. Hot sites are time-consuming to set up and more expensive than cold sites, but they dramatically reduce down time.

Datacenter Disaster Recovery

The physical elements of a data center can protect data and contribute to faster disaster recovery in certain types of disasters. For instance, fire suppression tools will help data and computer equipment survive a fire. A backup power source will help businesses sail through power outages without grinding operations to a halt. Of course, none of these physical disaster recovery tools will help in the event of a cyber-attack.

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS):

In the event of a disaster or ransomware attack, a DRaaS provider moves an organization’s computer processing to its own cloud infrastructure, allowing a business to continue operations seamlessly from the vendor’s location, even if an organization’s servers are down.

Back Up as a Service:

Similar to backing up data at a remote location, with Back Up as a Service, a third-party provider backs up an organization’s data, but not its IT infrastructure.

Instant Recovery

Instant recovery is similar to point-in-time copies, except that instead of copying a database, instant recovery takes a snapshot of an entire virtual machine.

Point-In-Time Copies

Point-in-time copies, also known as point-in-time snapshots, make a copy of the entire database at a given time. Data can be restored from this back-up, but only if the copy is stored off site or on a virtual machine that is unaffected by the disaster.

Virtualization

Organizations can back up certain operations and data or even a working replica of an organization’s entire computing environment on off-site virtual machines that are unaffected by physical disasters.

Types of Disaster Recovery

Back-up

This is the simplest type of disaster recovery and entails storing data off site or on a removable drive. However, just backing up data provides only minimal business continuity help, as the IT infrastructure itself is not backed up.

Cold Site

In this type of disaster recovery, an organization sets up a basic infrastructure in a second, rarely used facility that provides a place for employees to work after a natural disaster or fire.

Hot Site

A hot site maintains up-to-date copies of data at all times. Hot sites are time-consuming to set up and more expensive than cold sites, but they dramatically reduce down time.

Datacenter Disaster Recovery

The physical elements of a data center can protect data and contribute to faster disaster recovery in certain types of disasters. For instance, fire suppression tools will help data and computer equipment survive a fire. A backup power source will help businesses sail through power outages without grinding operations to a halt. Of course, none of these physical disaster recovery tools will help in the event of a cyber-attack.

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS):

In the event of a disaster or ransomware attack, a DRaaS provider moves an organization’s computer processing to its own cloud infrastructure, allowing a business to continue operations seamlessly from the vendor’s location, even if an organization’s servers are down.

Back Up as a Service:

Similar to backing up data at a remote location, with Back Up as a Service, a third-party provider backs up an organization’s data, but not its IT infrastructure.

Instant Recovery

Instant recovery is similar to point-in-time copies, except that instead of copying a database, instant recovery takes a snapshot of an entire virtual machine.

Point-In-Time Copies

Point-in-time copies, also known as point-in-time snapshots, make a copy of the entire database at a given time. Data can be restored from this back-up, but only if the copy is stored off site or on a virtual machine that is unaffected by the disaster.

Virtualization

Organizations can back up certain operations and data or even a working replica of an organization’s entire computing environment on off-site virtual machines that are unaffected by physical disasters.

Benefits of Disaster Recovery

No organization can afford to ignore disaster recovery. The two most important benefits of having a disaster plan in place, including effective DR software, are:

Cost Savings: Planning for potential disruptive events can save businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars and even mean the difference between a company surviving a natural disaster or folding.

Faster recovery: Depending on the disaster recovery strategy and the types of disaster recovery tools used, businesses can get up and running much faster after a disaster, or even continue operations as if nothing had happened.

Benefits of Disaster Recovery

No organization can afford to ignore disaster recovery. The two most important benefits of having a disaster plan in place, including effective DR software, are:

Cost Savings: Planning for potential disruptive events can save businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars and even mean the difference between a company surviving a natural disaster or folding.

Faster recovery: Depending on the disaster recovery strategy and the types of disaster recovery tools used, businesses can get up and running much faster after a disaster, or even continue operations as if nothing had happened.

Benefits of Disaster Recovery

No organization can afford to ignore disaster recovery. The two most important benefits of having a disaster plan in place, including effective DR software, are:

Cost Savings: Planning for potential disruptive events can save businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars and even mean the difference between a company surviving a natural disaster or folding.

Faster recovery: Depending on the disaster recovery strategy and the types of disaster recovery tools used, businesses can get up and running much faster after a disaster, or even continue operations as if nothing had happened.

Knowledge Base

How it Works

A Security Operation Center (SOC) is a centralized function within an organization employing people, processes, and technology to continuously monitor and improve an organization's security posture while preventing, detecting, analyzing, and responding to cybersecurity incidents.

Cloud transformation is simply the process of moving your work to the cloud, including migration of apps, software programs, desktops, data, or an entire infrastructure in alignment with the business objectives of the organization.

Utility computing allows the user to pay only for what they are using. It is a plug-in managed by an organization which decides what type of services has to be deployed from the cloud.

In Cloud Computing, systems integrator provides the strategy of the complicated process used to design a cloud platform. Integrator allows to create more accurate hybrid and  private cloud network, as integrators have all the knowledge about the data center creation.